Recap of the CSO50 Conference

 

Recap of the CSO50 Conference

Authored by: Carolyn Crandall, Attivo Networks CMO, and Chief Deception Officer – Last week, I had the honor of attending the CSO50 Conference, hosted by IDG’s CSO magazine. The conference brings together prominent figures in the cybersecurity industry to discuss best practices to address the ever-evolving threat landscape. This year’s conference focused on “Leveraging World Class Security Strategies,” with keynote sessions and presentations designed to help shape the future of IT security and risk management.

This year’s conference featured an impressive list of speakers who shared their best practices for addressing a wide range of security challenges. To name a few, Matthew Harper, director of cyber-crime prevention at Aflac, discussed methods of predicting and preventing fraudulent activity. Scott Moser, CISO, Caesars Entertainment, expanded on the importance of mitigating risk with ongoing cybersecurity risk assessment. Bobby Julka, SVP, access and identity engineering, Bank of America, also covered securing sensitive and encrypted data and transactions.

I was also asked to speak at the conference and had the privilege of presenting on deception technology and its value in identifying, investigating, and responding to attacks. Deception has been gaining significant traction in many key verticals as organizations increasingly recognize the necessity of in-network defenses. Events like CSO50 present a great opportunity to educate the CISO community about new technology innovations that address and close gaps on today’s security challenges. My session, titled “Deception Technology: A Look Under the Hood,” shared deception use cases and how the technology fits within security frameworks, reduces dwell time, accelerates response, and builds a more active approach to defense.

I was pleased to see the increased awareness of deception technology, with many organizations interested in 2019 and 2020 budgetary planning support. During the event, we also had a high interaction round table with security executives around challenges and solutions surrounding threat detection. The round table was an excellent opportunity to review our threat detection survey results and get their anecdotal perspectives on the findings.

The CSO50 award recognition has been a major part of the conference for the past seven years, honoring 50 of the most innovative organizations for security projects and initiatives that demonstrate both business value and thought leadership. The awards are typically given to organizations in a wide range of fields, and this year was no exception. Recipients included government entities like the City of Phoenix, financial institutions like IBC Bank, technology giants like Microsoft, educational institutions like Indiana University, investment groups such as Northwestern Mutual, and many others. The host of industries represented by the CSO50 Award recipients serves as an important reminder that the need for security innovation is not unique to any single field, and cyber attackers do not discriminate in terms of which organizations they deem viable targets.

I was personally pleased to see several Attivo customers among the CSO50 Award recipients and nominees. It’s great to see organizations that we have worked with being recognized for their cybersecurity programs, and we look forward to working with many of this year’s other winners in the future.

CSO50 is always a great forum for educating a forward-thinking audience on deception technology and is also an opportunity to learn from other leaders in the security space and see how organizations are tackling the cybersecurity challenges unique to their specific industries. By collaborating and learning from each other, we make the world safer and stronger. It has been an honor to both teach and learn at the conference for the last several years, and I look forward to seeing many of the same faces—and some new ones—at the CSO50 Conference next year.

13:38 19 April in Blogs, Event
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